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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Wjousts5-Jan-10 8:02
MemberWjousts5-Jan-10 8:02 
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Trevortni6-Jan-10 7:05
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Eddy Vluggen8-Jan-10 1:21
professionalEddy Vluggen8-Jan-10 1:21 
General[Message Deleted] Pin
Wjousts5-Jan-10 8:02
MemberWjousts5-Jan-10 8:02 
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Eddy Vluggen5-Jan-10 8:27
professionalEddy Vluggen5-Jan-10 8:27 
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
yiangos8-Jan-10 0:04
professionalyiangos8-Jan-10 0:04 
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Eddy Vluggen8-Jan-10 0:32
professionalEddy Vluggen8-Jan-10 0:32 
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
yiangos8-Jan-10 4:15
professionalyiangos8-Jan-10 4:15 
Eddy Vluggen wrote:
The way you're explaining it, it's not a different representation, but a conversion. Something like going from HTML to RTF.


It's a conversion, it's deterministic macroscopically, and it has a rather simple (but not too simple) conversion function. Sort of like a switch with 3 cases per transition.

Check this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooling_curve[^]

This graph shows what happens to the temperature of a material(the temperature is related to the mean kinetic energy of the molecules, irrespective of state) as it goes from liquid (far left, smooth decline) to solid (far right, smooth decline again). Notice the sharp angle and the plateau that occurs at "freezing" temperature. Sharp angles in physics denote violent changes. Here, when the liquid (say, water) reaches this temperature (for water, 273 Kelvin), the temperature in the water stops dropping although we continue to pump heat out of it (by using e.g. a freezer). In this transient state, both ice and water co-exist, as some molecules have so little internal energy left, that the binding forces that keep them together forcefully bind them to a lattice, stopping any "attempt" to escape or move freely. Other molecules still have enough energh to overcome this attraction, and still move as if they're liquid. The heat taken from water to convert it from water of 273 Kelvin (or 0C, or 32F) to ice of the same temperature is called latent heat, and it's a distinct characteristic of the material itself.

A similar curve exists for the transition between liquid and gas.

The funny thing is that under pressure, the width of the plateau in that graph changes, and also the temperature at which it occurs changes. For instance, gas inside a can of spray is at such high pressure, that even in room temperature, it's a liquid. Above a certain value of pressure (dependent on the material as well) it actually vanishes. At such high pressure, it makes no sense to talk about gas, liquid or solid state. There's no real distinction between the three. We believe that this is what goes on deep inside the gas giant planets of the solar system.

By the way, it's fun th check out the qualities of superfluids[^], such as liquid helium

Gasp, another wall of text! Ok, I'll shut up now...

Φευ! Εδόμεθα υπό ρηννοσχήμων λύκων!
(Alas! We're devoured by lamb-guised wolves!)
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Eddy Vluggen8-Jan-10 6:19
professionalEddy Vluggen8-Jan-10 6:19 
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Chris Austin5-Jan-10 7:38
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
kinar5-Jan-10 7:52
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Trevortni6-Jan-10 7:03
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
kinar5-Jan-10 7:51
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Dan Neely5-Jan-10 9:17
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
itsravie5-Jan-10 23:37
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Trevortni6-Jan-10 6:58
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
snowman535-Jan-10 12:18
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Member 965-Jan-10 12:20
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Mark_Wallace5-Jan-10 21:12
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
patbob6-Jan-10 6:10
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Mateusz Jakub6-Jan-10 8:26
MemberMateusz Jakub6-Jan-10 8:26 
GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
SomeGuyThatIsMe6-Jan-10 9:00
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
Owen Lawrence6-Jan-10 18:08
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GeneralRe: Snow and physics Pin
RedZombie1258-Jan-10 10:48
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GeneralTaken away from CP Pin
dan!sh 5-Jan-10 6:07
professional dan!sh 5-Jan-10 6:07 

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