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How important is software architecture in Software Development?   [Edit]

Survey period: 8 Mar 2010 to 15 Mar 2010

Is spending the time architecting your software important, or does making it up as you go along satisfy your needs? Be honest. (Suggested by Abhinav S)

OptionVotes% 
Cannot do without it36346.36
Important - but not critical34343.81
Of little importance577.28
Not important202.55



 
GeneralRe: Depends on the Client Pin
RedSonja8-Mar-10 21:03
RedSonja8-Mar-10 21:03 
GeneralChannel 9 video on the topic (link) Pin
Josh Fischer8-Mar-10 3:31
Josh Fischer8-Mar-10 3:31 
GeneralPhilosophically Not So Clear Cut Pin
W Balboos, GHB8-Mar-10 3:03
W Balboos, GHB8-Mar-10 3:03 
GeneralDepends on the size of the project, and how experienced the developer is. PinPopular
ZTransform7-Mar-10 22:54
ZTransform7-Mar-10 22:54 
GeneralRe: Depends on the size of the project, and how experienced the developer is. Pin
Josh Fischer8-Mar-10 3:29
Josh Fischer8-Mar-10 3:29 
GeneralRe: Depends on the size of the project, and how experienced the developer is. Pin
Don Driskell8-Mar-10 4:12
Don Driskell8-Mar-10 4:12 
GeneralA Tale of Two Mistakes Pin
peterchen7-Mar-10 21:24
peterchen7-Mar-10 21:24 
GeneralRe: A Tale of Two Mistakes Pin
myker8-Mar-10 3:25
myker8-Mar-10 3:25 
Agree with this. A recent project I was brought in on included a project that was broken down into 5 pieces, each formally created to represent a piece of functionality for the end product. Trouble was that during development, the business goals changed, and as a result, so did the functionality. Now we have functionality that overlaps across two or more of the formally defined pieces. So where does the new functionality fit? We could create more pieces, but then we would have even greater overlap. We could just randomly pick a place to put it, but then we complicate maintenance, because there is now more than one place to look if the code needs modification. As requirements change, as they inevitably do, the formal structure gets more archaic.

I think it's wiser to structure your project around a software development pattern than a set of requirements, because requirements change too often. One good example is ASP.NET MVC, where you have specific folders for Models, Controllers and Views, plus a well defined pattern for the URLs, which are a great indicator of where to look when code needs to be maintained.
GeneralRe: A Tale of Two Mistakes Pin
peterchen10-Mar-10 8:10
peterchen10-Mar-10 8:10 

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