Click here to Skip to main content
15,879,613 members
Home / Discussions / Hardware & Devices
   

Hardware & Devices

 
PinnedHOW TO ANSWER A QUESTION PinPopular
Chris Maunder16-Jul-09 3:09
cofounderChris Maunder16-Jul-09 3:09 
PinnedHow to get an answer to your question Pin
Chris Maunder16-Jul-09 3:05
cofounderChris Maunder16-Jul-09 3:05 
QuestionNew Monitor and AOEMI BackUP Pin
Choroid8-Mar-24 5:23
Choroid8-Mar-24 5:23 
AnswerRe: New Monitor and AOEMI BackUP Pin
Gerry Schmitz8-Mar-24 7:44
mveGerry Schmitz8-Mar-24 7:44 
GeneralRe: New Monitor and AOEMI BackUP Pin
Choroid9-Mar-24 7:54
Choroid9-Mar-24 7:54 
QuestionWindows rejects driver signed by EV certificate and Microsoft hardware site [UPDATED] Pin
Richard Andrew x6417-Feb-24 10:05
professionalRichard Andrew x6417-Feb-24 10:05 
AnswerRe: Windows rejects driver signed by EV certificate and Microsoft hardware site [UPDATED] Pin
jschell19-Feb-24 5:23
jschell19-Feb-24 5:23 
GeneralRe: Windows rejects driver signed by EV certificate and Microsoft hardware site [UPDATED] Pin
RedDk19-Feb-24 7:30
RedDk19-Feb-24 7:30 
GeneralRe: Windows rejects driver signed by EV certificate and Microsoft hardware site [UPDATED] Pin
Richard Andrew x6419-Feb-24 10:56
professionalRichard Andrew x6419-Feb-24 10:56 
QuestionDriver Package Submission INF File [SOLVED] Pin
Richard Andrew x6417-Feb-24 6:31
professionalRichard Andrew x6417-Feb-24 6:31 
QuestionTransistors Pin
Calin Negru13-Dec-23 7:58
Calin Negru13-Dec-23 7:58 
AnswerRe: Transistors Pin
trønderen13-Dec-23 9:42
trønderen13-Dec-23 9:42 
Calin Negru wrote:
a high power current acts as a switch that can turn on and off the circulation of a lower power current
Rather the other way around: A low power current can switch a higher power current on and off. Or, in analog transistors: Turn up or down the high power current proportionally to the controlling low power current. So the purpose of the transistor was to amplify the signal.

In digital circuits, you really do not need this amplification. The output from the first transistor need only be strong enough to turn the second transistor on (i.e. opening it to let a signal through) or off.

Under special circumstances, where the output of the first transistor is distributed to a whole row of second transistors, e.g. located on the row of plugin cards on a mainboard bus, the output signal must be strong enough to feed everyone of them. You don't see much of that any more: In the days of S100, ISA and MCA buses, you could plug 4-5-6-7 cards into a bus, side by side - the bus was like an AC power strip, delivering signals to a lot of recipients. You don't see much of that any more, partly because lots of what once required a large extension card now is provided on the CPU (or supporting 'chip set'), and partly because new bus standards have reduced the maximum 'fan out', to reduce the requirements for the bus electronics. Actually, lots of what we today refer to as 'bus' interconnects are really one-to-one signal lines.

(For the pedantic ones: It still isn't wrong to call it a 'bus': (Omni)bus means no more than 'For everyone'. In the days when the COM and LPT ports were used for 'everything', they were '(omni)busses', linguistically speaking.)

But talking about bus fanout and that sort of thing are special cases. Within a CPU, the current delivered from the output of a transistor is always enough to drive the input of the following transistor(s), even if there might be two or three of them receiving the same signal.
GeneralRe: Transistors Pin
Richard Andrew x6413-Dec-23 10:11
professionalRichard Andrew x6413-Dec-23 10:11 
GeneralRe: Transistors Pin
trønderen13-Dec-23 13:57
trønderen13-Dec-23 13:57 
GeneralRe: Transistors Pin
jschell14-Dec-23 4:27
jschell14-Dec-23 4:27 
GeneralRe: Transistors Pin
Calin Negru13-Dec-23 21:35
Calin Negru13-Dec-23 21:35 
GeneralRe: Transistors Pin
trønderen18-Dec-23 5:01
trønderen18-Dec-23 5:01 
AnswerRe: Transistors Pin
Ed Attfield18-Dec-23 3:50
Ed Attfield18-Dec-23 3:50 
GeneralRe: Transistors Pin
trønderen18-Dec-23 5:16
trønderen18-Dec-23 5:16 
GeneralRe: Transistors Pin
Calin Negru21-Dec-23 4:39
Calin Negru21-Dec-23 4:39 
QuestionCan't write to my NTFS-formatted external hard drive on Mac, what should I do? Pin
seekco30-Oct-23 21:55
seekco30-Oct-23 21:55 
AnswerRe: Can't write to my NTFS-formatted external hard drive on Mac, what should I do? Pin
jschell20-Nov-23 7:37
jschell20-Nov-23 7:37 
AnswerRe: Can't write to my NTFS-formatted external hard drive on Mac, what should I do? Pin
k505420-Nov-23 10:28
mvek505420-Nov-23 10:28 
QuestionMemory Pin
Calin Negru21-Oct-23 3:31
Calin Negru21-Oct-23 3:31 
AnswerRe: Memory Pin
trønderen21-Oct-23 5:16
trønderen21-Oct-23 5:16 

General General    News News    Suggestion Suggestion    Question Question    Bug Bug    Answer Answer    Joke Joke    Praise Praise    Rant Rant    Admin Admin   

Use Ctrl+Left/Right to switch messages, Ctrl+Up/Down to switch threads, Ctrl+Shift+Left/Right to switch pages.